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Staff

AnthonyAnthony Nicholls, President and CEO
PhD, Florida State University, 1988

Anthony Nicholls is from Plymouth, England, home to what used to be one of the worst soccer teams in the nation. He studied Physics at Oxford after which, looking for something different, he joined the Institute for Molecular Biophysics at Florida State University. There he studied quantum dispersion of excitations in biological systems with William Rhodes and football with Bobby Bowden. He earned his Ph.D. in biophysics in 1988 and began a post-doc with Barry Honig at Columbia University, New York. There he re-wrote the electrostatics program DelPhi and wrote the widely-used graphics software GRASP. Owning and controlling rights to neither, he listened to the wisdom of Dave Weininger, founder of Daylight C.I.S., and left Columbia in 1997 to found OpenEye in Santa Fe, New Mexico. His chief desire is to have the work ethic of his father who, in 1996, retired as the longest serving postman in England (48.5 years).


GeoffA. Geoffrey Skillman, Senior Vice President, Research
MD, UCSF School of Medicine, 2000
PhD, UCSF School of Pharmacy, 1999

Geoff Skillman graduated from Stanford with a degree in Chemistry in 1990. His herculean efforts at UCSF earned him a Ph.D. with Tack Kuntz in 1999 (Structure-Based Design of Combinatorial Libraries) and an M.D. in 2000. Geoff enjoys fishing, biking and relaxing with his family. He was also one of the OEChem authors, wrote Omega 1.8, Filter, QuacPac, the LexiChem Plugin and now Brood. He is now in charge of scientific research at OpenEye, which just goes to show that no good deed goes unpunished.


MattMatthew Stahl, Senior Vice President, OE Tech
PhD, University of Arizona, 1995

Matthew Stahl received a B.S. degree in Chemistry and Biochemistry from the University of Washington in 1991. He then attended the University of Arizona and received his Ph.D. working with Dr. Eugene Mash. Matthew's dissertation work included a modeling study of the transition states of diastereoselective nucleophilic additions to cyclopropyl ketones. Upon completion of his Ph.D. in 1995 he accepted a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University working for Professor E. J. Corey. Matthew then joined the Biophysics group at Vertex Pharmaceuticals, and was later promoted to Manager of ChemInformatics. In 1998, Matthew accepted a position at OpenEye Scientific Software as Chief Scientific Geek.

Prior to OpenEye he authored or co-authored Babel, Padre, Wizard III, LHASA, DEREK, XBabel, Mongoose to name but a few. At OpenEye he wrote the original version of ROCS, was one of the OEChem hive-minds and continues to develop Omega. In addition, he created OELib, that now has an independent open-source existence.


BobBob Tolbert, Senior Vice President, Development
PhD, University of Idaho, 1997

Bob Tolbert received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from the United States Naval Academy in 1983. Upon graduation he entered Nuclear Power training and served as an officer aboard submarines in the U. S. Navy for ten years. Bob earned a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1997 from the University of Idaho where he worked with W. Dan Edwards studying the theory of atoms in molecules as applied to homoaromaticity. In 1998, Bob joined the Information Technology group at Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., where, as a Senior Principal Systems Engineer, he was responsible for all aspects of computational chemistry and cheminformatics. In 2002, Bob ran away to join the circus. And the circus was glad to have him. Now ringmaster to the plethora of OpenEye product, Bob continues the high-wire act of programming and managing those who program. He is responsible for the current ROCS, EON, python and java toolkits and has contributed to nearly every other program. Who said the circus was supposed to be fun?


JanetJanet Rasmussen, VP, Finance

Janet Rasmussen, the original model for the character "Emma Peel" in the Avengers, joined OpenEye in 2003 when Mercury was in retrograde. Which explains a lot really, although none of us is sure exactly what. But we do know OpenEye has never been the same since in that people actually get paid at the end of the month rather than a random date afterwards, the words "Don't make me set Janet on you" is about the only threat from Anthony anyone takes seriously and we'd all eat even worse junk food without her. As Vice President, Finance, she is supposed to keep the money we make and we all vaguely hope she isn't taking that role too literally, especially given her predilection for tropical islands. She claims to have met John Denver but we've never clarified if that was before or after his accident.
Janet. R-E-S-P-E-C-T.


Matt Bagwell, Web Developer

Biography coming soon.


cynthiaCynthia Bancale, Marketing Manager
BFA, Temple University, 1986

Cynthia was actually hired to work on non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory and its application to the Smoluchowski diffusion equation, but one day at lunch we discovered she was the only one who actually knew what “Social Media” was, and when she explained it to us we thought we should get us some of that. And, as luck would have it, she's also pretty damn good at that whole 'design' thing, so instead of being our partial differential equations geek we made her our Marketing Manager. As such she'll be spreading the OpenEye word like a thin coating of Marmite on warm buttered toast. One more thing. Cynthia gave up caffeine several years ago and as a result is a much calmer person. Once you know her this is really kind of frightening.


Jose Batista, Ph.D., Developer

Biography coming soon.


chrisChristopher Bayly, Senior Scientist
Ph.D. University of New Brunswick, 1991
Quacpac toolkit developer

Starting off with a B.Sc. in Biochemistry, Christopher initially moved into synthetic organic chemistry, naively believing a professor mentor that this was the way to unlock the secrets of bio-organic chemistry. A couple of years, several enol esters, and many columns later, he saw the light and switched to theoretical chemistry, tying up the synthetic organic work with a Master's degree. Beginning his doctorate in Theoretical Chemistry peculiarly unconcerned about the fact that he had never actually done any, he found it took a little longer than he thought to plow through quantum theory but nevertheless managed to complete his Ph.D. He found RESPite in a wonderful and stimulating but all-too-brief postdoc in Peter Kollman's group at UCSF. Subsequently joining Merck Frosst in Montreal in 1992, he founded and built the Chemistry Modeling and Informatics group there, leading it right through to the very end with the closure of the research site in 2010 (not his fault). While working in drug discovery there he could not resist the siren call to continue external collaborations and the development of new methods. The charging method AM1-BCC (with his first PhD student Araz Jakalian) is probably the best known of these methods, so far, although his work on molecular polarization with Jean-Francois Truchon was truly EPIC. Somewhere along the collaborative way he fell in (arguing) with Anthony Nicholls and his motley crew at OpenEye, and when opportunity recently presented itself, Christopher threw in his lot with them, starting at OpenEye in January 2011.


krisztinaKrisztina Boda, Senior Scientific Developer
PhD, University of Leeds, 2009
Lead OEChem, OEDepict and GraphSim toolkit developer

Krisztina came to us highly recommended by Johnny Gasteiger and Peter Johnson. We used to think that was because of her skills in computer science, her original training, or chemiformatics, her current specialty. But as time goes by we realize the truth is probably close to this - when she returns from visiting her family in Hungary she brings back SUCH. GOOD. CHOCOLATE. So thank you Peter, thank you Johnny, our waistlines may never be the same. Actually, she is possibly the most industrious person we've seen at OpenEye, presenting two posters to most people's one. This, unfortunately, has spurred something of a competition, with someone presenting three posters at EuroCUP III in Toledo. As we can't possibly let anyone beat us in anything, we eagerly look forward to her first four poster meeting. No pressure, Krisztina.



Craig Bruce, Scientific Developer
PhD, University of Nottingham, 2010

Biography coming soon.


lisaLisa Chubrilo, Administrative Assistant

Lisa, Lisa, Lisa. So many stories and so little time. Let's see, raised by Gypsies she entered the Sorbonne at 15 only to get kicked out after a wild affair with a famous French existentialist. Seeking solace she studied the pack behavior of wild Chihuahua in the Mexican desert, earning her the nickname "La Dama con Tobillos Fuerte, literally, "The Dame with Tough Ankles". They still sing folksongs about her in the hills. Coming North, she agreed to work for us for free if we'd buy her tequila and the NHL sports package. We lied about the hockey so ended up paying her. Just as well, otherwise she might go back to the Sorbonne and we'd all be worse off, although existentialism might gain a new lease on life.


bruceBrian Cole, Senior Developer
BS, Temple University, 2007
Toolkit Project Manager
FastROCS/GPU computing lead

We first met Brian while he was an undergraduate at Temple University doing part-time work at Wyeth. He claimed he was good at Aikido and after seeing him throw Matt around the room it was obvious he had a future at OpenEye. As a keen student of both Star Trek and Star Wars, he's added real cultural depth to the organization, plus his wife, aka Awesome Girl, cooks us cakes. Oh, he does do some programming and many claim he is gifted in that area. At least those who don't want to be thrown around the room. Brian has great enthusiasm for his work. His focus recently has been on multi-threaded applications and toolkits, in particular Spicoli, and on new hardware developments. He has a plan to go back to school to get his PhD, but since he can't even buy plane tickets for the right week we anticipate, and hope, this may take a while.


tomTom Darden, Senior Scientist
Ph.D. UC Berkeley, 1979
Lead Statistics toolkit developer

Tom Darden, aka, the man who made simulations of proteins actually not look stupid. Tom, as you will recall, was responsibly for bringing Ewald sums to molecular simulation. Before that, those of us in the implicit solvent world loved to sit back and smile smugly at how the explicit solvent boys and girls could not keep a protein from unfolding if they kept running their simulations. Tom's work changed all that and so before he did any more damage, i.e. actually made simulations actually useful, we thought we had better hire him away to the desert. Here, he is our Mathematician-in-Residence, competing with Anthony to see who can have the most unread books on their shelves.


Jack Delany, Ph.D., Senior Scientific Developer

Biography coming soon.



Dennis Elking, Research Scientist
PhD, University of Georgia, 2007

Biography coming soon.


laszloLaszlo Fusti Molnar, Research Scientist
Ph.D. University Eotvos Roland, Hungary, 1999
Lead developer for Polymorph project

Laszlo comes from a quantum background, having worked with the great Peter Pulay, briefly at Q-Chem, and also with the Dude, Kennie Merz of the Quantum Theory Project at the University of Florida. Before that he did his PhD with Peter Szalay in Hungary, proving to us that all Hungarians have to have 'sz' somewhere in their names and also Gabriel Balint-Kurti in Bristol. Laszlo is porting OpenEye software to quantum computers, i.e. computing devices that make use of the Superposition Principle to run potentially an exponential number of calculations simultaneously via Entangled Quantum States. He's also a keen tennis player and .. Ok, we have to admit, that thing about quantum computers was a joke, but he is working on some exciting projects.


mattgMatt Geballe, Applications Scientist
PhD, Emory University, 2009

Matt came to CUP. Matt gave a great talk. Matt now works here. 'Nuff said? He's now the SAMPL man, taking over the responsibilities that made first Ant and then Geoff realize the beauty of being able to pass the buck. But he makes it look easy, darn it. Matt hails from the 50th state (Hawaii for the historically challenged) and thinks the calm, cool, laid-back attitudes at OpenEye reminds of home. Ok, he doesn't exactly say that, but we're pretty sure that's what he thinks. While being disappointed he doesn't seem to have heard of 'Hawaii-5-0', we like him anyway. Book him, Dano.


jeffJeffrey S. Grandy, Director, Emerging Markets
MS, Washington State University, 2000

The third of our sales, oops, account management trilogy, Jeff is our West Coast representative. He spent some of his early years in England, which probably accounts for his affable nature and his good taste, and has traveled extensively, sometimes with the Grateful Dead, sometimes solo. Some in the company had a hard time when he first joined in 2007 with the name collision with Geoff Skillman, although why people would think "Grandy" and "Skillman" sound the same is beyond some of us. We also hadn't anticipated his exceptional driving skills, no doubt developed during rush hour on San Francisco freeways. Who knew handbrake turns were legal on major highways? Jeff Grandy, laid-back dude, whiskey connoisseur, our guy way out West.


jamesJames Haigh, Senior Applications Scientist
PhD, University of Southhampton, 1995

James earned his B.Sc. (Hons) degree in Chemistry from the University of Southampton, and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry, also from Southampton. He first came to the US for post-doctoral research in polymer physics at Florida State University with the famous Leo Mandelkern (Flory’s last student), in the same building where Anthony did his PhD, though not at the same time. On returning to England he worked for OpenEye at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, researching the shape-space of drug-like molecule with Andy Grant, and developed in-house software for AZ using the OpenEye toolkits. He wrote many papers during this period. In his head. He returned to the States in October of 2010 to take on the role of toolkit support. And writing papers.


paulPaul Hawkins, Applications Science Group Leader
PhD, University of St. Andrews, 1993

What were the odds that OpenEye would hire another Englishman? Long, you might have thought, which just goes to show why bookies make their money. Paul used to work at Tripos, and when we saw him give a talk that made their software look good, we made him an offer. Paul is the first of a new breed at OpenEye, an application scientist. What we mean by that is that Paul will be helping customers do science with our applications, either by visiting them and delighting them with stories of how dysfunctional we are, or by working on examples, white-papers and publications in the home office. Paul, he's from OpenEye and he's here to help you.



Keyshia Hollis, Administrative Assistant

Biography coming soon.



Jharrod LaFon,Developer
MS, New Mexico State University, 2012

Biography coming soon.


Burt Leland, Ph.D., Senior Scientific Developer

Biography coming soon.



Fred Livingston, Accounts Manager
PhD, Duke University, 2000

Biography coming soon.


markMark McGann, Principal Developer
PhD, Tulane, 1998
Lead Docking Toolkit developer
Lead FRED application developer

Mark McGann received his B.S. from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute in the Spring of 1993. He then spent six months as a quality assurance engineer at Rogers Materials Molding division before entering graduate school at Tulane University Chemical Engineering department in January 1994. His graduate research focused on detailed molecular simulations of polymer crystals. Mark graduated from Tulane with a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in the fall of 1998 and took a position at the Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute where he developed fast docking programs for structure-based drug design in collaboration with OpenEye. He joined OpenEye in October 2000. Mark has the most amazing collection of video games anyone has ever seen.


Beatrice Montoya, HR Administrator

Biography coming soon.


markJoe Moon, Senior Developer
BS, University of Kansas, 1985
Lead VIDA application developer
User interface developer

Joe received a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Kansas in 1985, started a Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry at Kansas, then left to join the Upjohn Company to help them write a molecular modeling package, Mosaic. During this time he was a coauthor of the famous “Anchor and Grow” paper with Jeff Howe (yes, that Joe Moon). He later led the development of Mosaic at Pharmacia, and more recently led the team developing Pfizer's visualization software, MoViT. Joe joined OpenEye to finally escape from visualization software, and is now responsible for VIDA.


scottScott Parker, Director, Strategic Partnerships
BS, Salem State College, 1992

Scott Parker is a Spoken Word performer who has bridged the gap between poetry and science. His dynamic style of speaking and Fire Flowpoetry combines rhythm, science, and a highly condensed depth of poetic language. His delivery on stage makes him one of the most unique and riveting performers on the U.S. scientific and artistic landscape. Scott speaks shamanically through poems of drug discovery and computational methods, tells modeling stories of the international pharmaceutical and Biotech communities, and poetically rants and rages about both Ligand-based and Structure-based drug discovery. In 2006, he was appointed as the first ever "Poet-In-Residence" at OpenEye Scientific Software, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico's premier computational Chemistry software provider. He has performed over 500 times in the USA with other computational companies, modeling software outfits, and as a solo poet.


phillipPhillip Sawunyama, Director, Support & Training
PhD, University of Wales, Swansea, 1994

Phillip is Mr. Support at OpenEye. He is responsible for the new bug reporting and tracking system at OpenEye, FogBugz, and for the new focus on training and documentation. He joined us in 2008 from Tripos. We always said we hired Paul Hawkins from Tripos because in his interview he made Tripos software sound cool. Well, we hired Phillip because he explained ROCS to us in a way that made us think it was cool. (Disclaimer: which, of course, it really is, but when you live with it for ten years the magic can get lost). Phillip is originally from Zimbabwe, has lived in Japan and is one of the few people in the Santa Fe office to mean football when he says "football." He's brought a new dimension to the company and anyone who can make Anthony and Roger sit in the same room and 'train' them to use something new, clearly has exceptional powers. One of those people who makes you realize OpenEye has come a long way.



Justin Scheiber, Developer

Biography coming soon.


kevinKevin Schmidt Principal Developer
BS, MIT, 2001
Lead BROOD GUI developer
User interface developer

Kevin Schmidt decided to work at OpenEye when he saw Anthony drove a better car than he did. Prior to that moment of enlightenment he had worked in several real companies, including NASA-Ames and the ill-fated Ars Digita. He's a graduate of MIT and his last job involved writing the sound subsystem for the video game "Spiderman." In other words: he's a real programmer, unlike some of us.



Gunther Stahl, Senior Applications Scientist
PhD, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf

Biography coming soon.


vincentVincent Vivien Director of European Accounts
M.Phil., Heriot-Watt University, UK, 1998
M.Sc., Lyon School of Industrial Chemistry, France, 1997

Vincent came to us in a rather non-traditional way. After many years of rigorous study at a Shaolin temple in the Henan province in China, he wandered the highways and byways of European pharma and biotech, dispersing wisdom and sales quotes. Then, quite by chance, he came across rumor of the fabled OpenEye Way, a secret technique for convincing customers to buy software without conflict or anger, as exemplified by its founder. After passing many rigorous and exacting tests, such as eating at Horseman's Haven without complaining, he was inducted into the company in 2006 and has applied his newly refined skills with great vigor and success in our European office in Strasbourg, France. In particular, he organizes EuroCUP each year to great acclaim and shepherds application scientists around Europe, forcing them to sample expensive food and drink rare wines. Or at least that is what they claim. Oh, and he drives a 'very nice' car and claims he was once a medicinal chemist.

(Actually, he joined us in a very traditional way- he previously worked at BioReason. The rest is pretty accurate)


gregGregory L. Warren, Senior Applications Scientist
PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1994

Greg started work making brooms and tending honey bees. After one too many stings, he decided to try degrees in Chemistry and Biology from Walla Walla College (don't laugh). After graduation, and lacking employability, he decided to go to graduate school at MIT but was unable to decide on a course of study (note the pattern developing?). So he did protein crystallography, solution and solid-state NMR in the labs of Greg Petsko and Bob Griffin. In his spare time he played the French horn for beer money. (No really.) Following an "extended" post-doc in Brünger lab at Yale, he got his first job where he didn't have to panhandle, i.e., as a computational chemist at SmithKline Beecham later, unfortunately, to become GlaxoSmithKline. Tired of the incessant demands for monthly reports, he left in 2006 to join the hive-mind where he has the dubious honor of doubling OpenEye's pharmaceutical experience but once again gets stung a lot. There's a moral here somewhere.


stanStanislaw Wlodek, Senior Scientist
Ph.D. University of Warsaw, 1984
Lead Szybki toolkit developer
Lead Sybki application developer

Stan Wlodek received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Warsaw. He spent several years in Canada as a post-doc and then went south to the University of Houston where he worked with Andy MacCammon. He moved to Santa Fe in 1998. In the fall of 2001, Stan started working as a consultant with OpenEye, implementing the AM1-BCC charging method of Christopher Bayly. He decided against taking the coaching job for Poland in the 2002 World Cup, which can be directly related to Poland's lethargic performance, and joined OpenEye. Notwithstanding on how well Poland does in the 2010 competition, we anticipate Stan remaining at OpenEye and continuing his work on SZYBKI (he made us name it that) and AFITT (our bad).


mikeMike Word, Senior Scientist
Ph.D. Duke University, 2000
Lead OEBio Toolkit developer
SZmap Application developer

Apocryphal story but true- after first talking to Mike for 15 minutes I asked him why he hadn't been working for OpenEye for years. He looked suitably embarrassed and we still haven't had a good answer from him. Mike had worked at SmithKline and then at GSK and for the Richardson's at Duke before coming to Santa Fe. He likes astronomy, movies and knows more about proteins than the rest of us combined. Proteins, you know, those big clumpy things drugs bind to. So he's helping overcome our biases, bringing some fresh perspectives on what we can do with our toolkits and enjoying the wonders of New Mexico. About time.


Jun Zhang, Ph.D., Scientific Developer

Biography coming soon.


Ryuichiro Hara, Ph.D.
Toolkit Specialist, OpenEye Japan

Biography coming soon.


Makoto Ishizaki
Accounts Manager, OpenEye Japan

Biography coming soon.


Hideyuki Sato, Ph.D.
Applications Scientist, OpenEye Japan

Biography coming soon.


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